A Sad Little Event

dog-1742295_640I live in a mobile home facility for Seniors.  There is a large Rec Hall for events and we can participate in some activity almost every day if we want to.

Along the wall as we enter the Hall there are shelves with videos, books of all kinds and at the very end lots of jigsaw puzzles and some games.  I pick up some books there and check out the puzzles.  I have purchased and donated many of them.

Recently I brought home a few puzzles from the Rec Hall.  I love the challenge of these puzzles and almost always am working on one.

Last week I started a new one and sadly discovered that there were many missing pieces.  More than half of the border pieces were missing and to my surprise there were puzzle pieces that did not belong in this puzzle.  I always begin by sorting all the pieces by color and setting aside the borders.  Many of the pieces did not belong there. This puzzle could not be worked.

I had brought home 4 puzzles, so I looked at the others.  Upon opening one I found that several pieces in this box did not belong there.  They were some of the missing pieces of the first box.  Someone had switched handfuls of one puzzle in with the other, making both puzzles impossible to put together. It’s hard enough to do one puzzle, but when pieces are missing or don’t match the others it can’t be done.

I don’t have a clue as to who would do such a thing.  I am sorry to discover we have such an inconsiderate resident of our Mobile Home Park.  I want to let the other tenants of the Park know about this discovery, but I won’t.  I hope that whoever did it only destroyed the two boxes and won’t do it again.  It hurts too many of us who depend on a little diversion.

How Marlene’s Necklace Affected My Jewelry Making

Marlene-necklaceI belong to a group of ladies who meet once a month for brunch and to exchange the books we have read and pass them around. We originally began meeting to discuss our yearly trips to the library for family research in Salt Lake City. Four of us, Pam, Ruth, Kay and I were avid genealogists and made the trips each winter along with a few other friends. Kay has since passed away, too soon, and the three of us no longer make the trip to Utah although Pam is still involved in finding her ancestors.
It’s been a long time since those days, and as our small group grew in numbers the book exchange was the next step giving us a reason to meet and compare our activities. There are now up to 9 of us who meet, but often there might be 7 or less each month. I am, no doubt, the oldest of the group. One lady who was older recently passed away in her sleep. But I have a story to tell about her and her necklace, and how it affected the necklaces I now make.
All the ladies know that I make jewelry and I wear a different necklace to each brunch gathering. One day Marlene asked me if would make her a black necklace and I said, “I’d love to.”
Marlene couldn’t describe exactly what she wanted, but knowing her, I thought I could create something she would like. I had some beads in mind and I put together three different short length bead patterns with alternating black and silver beads. She chose one and I made the necklace and gave it to her. Needless to say, she was delighted and wore it many times. However, it broke. Beads fell all over the floor. She and her daughters collected as many as they could find and gave them to me. I made a new necklace for her at no charge. I don’t remember what she paid for the original necklace. I had offered it to her as a gift, but she insisted on paying me.
That experience made me think that if that happened to one of my necklaces, it could happen again. And indeed it did. One necklace broke while a friend was looking at it. That is not good.As any necklace is worn there is friction on the clasp as the necklace is put on and taken off. The friction rubs the small wire and wears it away. I finally found what I think will help to keep that from happening to the necklaces I now make.
I use a very tiny metal guard that holds the wire and keeps the clasp away from direct contact with the wire. The horseshoe shape guard prevents that friction so the movement of the clasp doesn’t erode the wire. All necklaces are susceptible to wear and tear, but this guard makes it less fragile.
The guard is very, very tiny and it is a bitch to put the ends of the strung beads together. My hands often shake, making it a tedious process, but I do it now for every necklace I make. Some of my necklaces are long enough to easily pass over the head, but not all. So the guard is used on those.
I think that what I do is a reflection of how I feel about the jewelry I make.

http://mizmlu.etsy.com

Family Fun With Fish

Family Fun With Fish

I found an article by my late husband Jim on how we got started on our fish keeping activity. It appeared in the FIN FUN bulletin of the L.E.R.C., Aquarium Society of Lockheed Employees Recreation Club in Burbank, dated October 1965. Here it is:

TANKS A LOT by Jim Denyer

There is a time in everyone’s life when the togetherness urge turns into madness.

Just such an event occurred to me during the month of January, 1964. About the middle of the month, my son, Jim Jr., came home from a visit to the local discount store with a ten-gallon tank, a pump, a filter, a small paper covered book on how to keep fish in the home.

The trouble was that he had run out of money before buying any fish. My wife, Marylou, said that the store had a “lot of very pretty ones and they aren’t too expensive”.

I felt generous, so we all got into the car (this trip included our two daughters, Circe and Jennifer) and went back to buy fish. A pair of guppies, platys, mollies, angel fish and kissing gouranis are the ones I remember buying. However, in the next few weeks I started looking at ads and visiting various
Fish stores in the vicinity. A trio of convict cichlids, a pair of paradise fish, some neons, and catfish were added.

I also started visiting the public library for books to read on the subject and to find out why it was getting harder to see the fish through the murky water.

About that time, Jim Jr., came home one day and announced that he had made collections and wanted to buy his own fish. He pointed out that they wouldn’t fit with the selections of Marylou and myself, so would I please get another tank so that he could have his back?

At this moment, Marylou registered a protest that my fish were biting hers.’’

The result was two tanks.

The population explosion, both by immigration from the local fish stores and by the first exciting miracle of live birth by the mollies soon caused further overcrowding.

In fact, despite the fact that I now have about 20 tanks, most of these are still overcrowded. The days of “one large tank should take care of all of our problems” have been replaced by “why don’t you get rid of some of the fish you don’t want?”

But we still enjoy them, that is, after the filters have been cleaned and they are fed and no new problems crop up and if I don’t have to figure where to put any of the new friends won at the raffle table and . . . . .

I copied this verbatim. Didn’t change a word. Although there are some things that are not quite correct. And the number of tanks grew to 45.
MizMlu
Owner MizMlu’s Etsy Store
http//mizmlu.etsy.com
Blog:
http://mludenyer.com

Halloween jewelry

I wore this necklace along with my beaded pumpkin earrings and a green blouse to a meeting of my friends last weekend.  We share books we’ve read and like.  I got a lot of compliments on both the earrings and my necklace.  I made the pumpkin earrings many years ago, only wear them during the Halloween period and they are an attention getter.  This peach colored necklace was perfect with them and the green blouse. http:mizmlu.etsy.com

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Managing Your Passwords & Keeping Them Safe

Education is the best protection against computer infection.

My very talented daughter, Circe, has just created a handy book in which you can keep your computer site passwords. The title is “ Keys to the Door” and there are 2 sizes. One is letter size, 8-1/2”x11” and the other is 6”x9” titled “Handy Keys to the Door”. Both books contain the same information and are easy to use and keep safe.

These books were created as a companion to those who understand the importance of computer security. 17 pages in the larger book have several lines and spaces for the date, e-mail or website, user name and password. She recommends you write in pencil so changes can be made easily. Spaces are also available in which to write the answers to your security questions.

The book she gave me is beginning to be filled up. I can now dispose of the bits of paper and scribbled notes I can hardly read, much less find, and locate my password book in seconds. I entered my passwords alphabetically so it is easy to find the site I want. I put 2 letters, more or less, on each page. If you prefer you could enter yours by subject matter. The choice is up to you.

Circe is well qualified to produce these books. She is an experienced computer security advocate as well as a speaker on this subject and other computer information. Her membership in Toastmasters allows her to educate her audience on many subjects. Her speaking biography can be seen on the Qualified Speakers of District 52, Toastmasters website: http://district 52speakersbureau.com/qualified-speakers-of-district-52/. The website for her computer security information is http://malwaretruth.com.

NEWLY PUBLISHED! Password Keeper books. On Amazon
http://bit.ly/keystothedoor

I DON’T HAVE A BFF or WHAT HAPPENED TO MY GIRL FRIENDS

My first girl friend lived down the street from me.  Her family had horses and we would take them out and ride up into the hills above Ventura Blvd. in Tarzana, CA. That area was all green with a little stream running through.  Those days were so long ago when I was in Elementary School that I have forgotten her name.  I lost touch with her after I graduated.  That area today is fully populated with very expensive homes.

When I was in High School in Canoga Park I had several girl friends. There were 4 of us who hung out together, Donna, Gene, (spelled like a boy), and Mary Lou, who spelled her name in 2 words, mine in one.  We used to go to the beach together.  And one summer afternoon we all bleached our hair blond.

My other friend in High School was Norma.  She wanted to be an actress and took classes in acting and diction which caused her to speak differently from the rest of us.  But she was talented.  I remember she married a Mexican boy who carried on his family’s traditions in which the male was King and the females obeyed the King’s desires.  That marriage didn’t last, there were no children, and I lost touch with her after I married.

All of my friends of those years drifted away when I entered UCLA and we all got married.

Then, after my first child was born I became interested in joining the Native Daughters of the Golden West.  I was one, after all.  I met Betty on the night we were initiated and we clicked immediately.  She was shy, as was I, and she was a talented artist.  She created all sorts of things and urged me to develop what ability I had.  She suffered from Shingles and tried to alleviate the pain by sitting in a bath tub full of warm water and baking soda.  Her marriage was not a happy one and eventually she left her husband and married the man across the street who had been in love with her for years. They moved to Carson City, NV.  Betty was my friend for more than 50 years.  We corresponded and often spoke on the phone.  Each time we called it was as if we had just talked the previous day.  Betty died of lung cancer.

Then my husband and I began playing contract bridge and we met several people who became friends.  One couple in particular was our partners in team games and although we played in tournaments together we didn’t socialize in other ways.  Then my husband died and they were my comfort through the worst of the next few years.  But they separated and divorced.  I still see Eve, but not often. We have known each other for more than 40 years.

Another group of friends I made during my years in the bridge world were Kay, Serene, Louise and Judy.  They had all been BFFs for a long time so if I was included it was with all 4 of them.  We had parties, including the husbands and my current date, went on rallies, and shared creative activities.  I was closest to Kay.  She and I would have a puzzle weekend occasionally.  She would provide the jigsaw puzzle at her house on a Saturday afternoon, we worked on the puzzle, had dinner with wine, gabbed, and I would spend the night there.  We could finish the puzzle on Sunday and I would go home.

When the 1994 Earthquake hit I was living within a mile of Kay’s home.  My townhouse was intact, but I was afraid to stay there alone so I spent 3 days at Kay and her husband’s home.  They had another couple also there for 3 weeks when their mobile home was burned to the ground and they had to find another place.

Kay introduced me to genealogy and helped me get started on searching for my ancestors.  This turned into an obsession which still occupies my life.  Kay and I began making yearly trips to Salt Lake City to do research and each time shared a room for a week.  Then others joined us so that we usually had a group of 10-15 people who all helped each other with their research.  We realized that all of us loved reading so we began meeting once a month for brunch and to exchange the books we have read and liked.  This group is still ongoing.  But I only see them once a month and have no other contact with them except an occasional email joke.

Some of the friends I met through bridge and genealogy are no longer living.  Judy was the first to go from lung cancer.  She was beautiful, extremely talented, generous, fun, and married to a bookie.  Louise was intellectual, very active in the bridge world, and married to a man who had extreme food dislikes.  Louise died from lung cancer.  Serene, also a bridge player and married to a bridge player died from lung cancer.  And my best friend, Kay, died from lung cancer.

I have no BFF.  I do not have lung cancer.  I am 86 years old and have outlived all my BFFs.  I have a few new friends that may develop into BFFs, but I doubt it.  I have a busy life, I don’t like to drive anywhere, my legs are weak, and my back hurts all the time, so I am content to stay home except for the 3 times a month when I meet with the book group, the games and movie group, and one new gathering of 4 of us who play cards.  It’s enough.  My BFF is my computer.

Must Have Book

BOECoverOLKindle

Must have book if you are thinking about opening a shop on Etsy, the world wide million $ site, to sell your creations or vintage items. This 51 page book, “Be An Etsy Seller” was written by two Etsy sellers who have experienced all the things you need to know when joining the Etsy community and have described them in detail. They hold your hand as you are walked step by step through the process. Joining Etsy is free. Putting your creations up for sale costs 20 cents per item and is listed for 4 months. Then if it hasn’t sold it can be re-listed for an additional 20 cents. All aspects of selling are covered, such as shipping, processing time, charging tax if necessary, how you want to be paid and many more subjects that other instruction books don’t cover. They are even in the process of creating a Spanish language version, coming soon.  To obtain this remarkable book go to

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00CRB6NUQ

Visit my Etsy shop at www.etsy.com/shop/mizmlu

Tarzan Centennial

I grew up in Tarzana, a community in the San Fernando Valley in So. California. The community is planning several celebrations of their famous resident and founder of the neighborhood.

The first story about Tarzan, created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, appeared in the 15-cent “The All Story” magazine of October 1912.  The title was “Tarzan of the Apes: A Romance of the Jungle” and the cover of the magazine depicted a brawny half naked man about to kill an enormous roaring lion.  It was an instant success for Burroughs, who up to that time had struggled to find his true calling.

The young Burroughs, from Chicago, had tried his luck as a cowboy, gold miner, shopkeeper, railroad cop and Sears & Roebuck manager.  He also joined the US Cavalry in Arizona to chase Apaches without success.  At the age of 37 with a wife and a 3rd child on the way he took a job as a sales manager of pencil sharpeners.   During this period, he had copious spare time and began reading many pulp magazines.  In 1929 he recalled thinking that…

…if people were paid for writing rot such as I read in some of those magazines, that I could write stories just as rotten. As a matter of fact, although I had never written a story, I knew absolutely that I could write stories just as entertaining and probably a whole lot more so than any I chanced to read in those magazines.

He sold his first story, “Under the Moon of Mars” in 1911.

Encouraged by that success he created 131 pages of the adventures of a true noble savage, Tarzan.  His hero, born of a marooned British Lord and Lady, but raised by a tribe of apes was an instant success and was the beginning of the Tarzan empire.  Burroughs wrote 26 Tarzan books, 50 Tarzan movies were made as well as appearances on TV, cartoons and comic books.   During his lifetime Burroughs wrote almost 70 books of science fiction and fantasy.

In 1919 Mr. Burroughs bought the Gen. Harrison Grey Otis estate and named it Tarzana Ranch.  In 1927 his estate was renamed the community of Tarzana.

He must have relished adventure because when over 60 years of age he applied for and was accepted as a war correspondent in World War II, the oldest one ever.

He died of a heart attack on March 19, 1950 at the age of 74 and his ashes are buried under a mulberry tree outside his former Ventura Blvd. office.